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Breeding

  • The Dachshund has an unmistakable look – long low body on short legs - that has earned it the nickname "Wiener Dog." Full of attitude, the Dachshund seeks the spotlight and demands attention, but offers loyalty, affection, and plenty of comedy in return.

  • Of all dog breeds, the Dalmatian is the most easily identified because of his distinctive coat. The image of a large white dog speckled with black spots all over his body, sitting on top of a fire truck or running along side a horse-drawn coach, is embedded in the minds of everyone, dog lover or no, regardless of age.

  • Dandie Dinmont Terriers are live-wire dogs that enjoy rousing play, yet can be as tough as nails when extracting a rodent from its den or when standing up to a challenge.

  • Designer breeds combine registered, pure dog breeds that are “mixed” on purpose to create designer breeds. Intentional mixing of breeds optimizes the best characteristics of each parent. Sometimes the dog may have more than two pure breeds in his bloodline, but unlike a mutt, his lineage can be identified.

  • Cat lovers consider sweet, soulful, kitty eyes gazing at them to be heartwarming. Those feline glances can melt some human hearts. But after the loss of a feline, canine, or human companion, could those mournful eyes indicate that the cat is actually mourning?

  • Dobies can be great family pets and most have been bred to live happily in the human environment. These large beauties are fiercely loyal, inspiring to look at, and endearing once you get to know them. They will protect you and stand by you in any situation.

  • Dogues de Bordeaux are calm, patient and extremely loyal. They will get very attached to their owners, and being left alone for long periods will break their hearts.

  • While most female birds have no problems laying eggs, occasionally they may encounter difficulty. When detected early, egg binding can usually be resolved easily.

  • English Cockers are friendly, active and love to be with their people. The breed is known to be particularly good with children, especially school-aged youngsters who have been taught how to behave around dogs.

  • Foxhounds have been bred for centuries to live as a pack in the kennel, with few living as house dogs. But if you raise one in the home, you're in for a pleasant surprise. They are easy-going, calm, and gentle; good with children, other dogs, and other pets.