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Cats + Nutrition

  • Giardiasis is an intestinal infection of man and animals cased by a microscopic protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis. Giardia is a simple one-celled parasitic species; it is not a "worm", bacteria, or virus.

  • The principle of feeding different-aged animals differently is called “life-stage feeding,” and it is a fairly straightforward concept. After all, we know that we must feed infant children differently than growing teenagers, and seniors have different nutritional needs than 30-somethings.

  • Megaesophagus is not a single disease. Instead it is considered a combination disorder in which the esophagus (the tube that carries food and liquid between the mouth and stomach) dilates and loses motility (its ability to move food into the stomach). When esophageal motility is decreased or absent, food and liquid accumulate in the esophagus.

  • Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the most common kidney-based disease in cats. Waste products are normally filtered out of the blood by the kidneys and excreted in the urine, but cats with CKD will end up with an accumulation of these waste products in the bloodstream as the filtering process breaks down. CKD occurs on a spectrum, progressing through four stages with each subsequent stage reflecting a more severe phase of the disease than the last.

  • Feeding your cat the appropriate amount of a well balanced diet is vital to the maintenance of overall health and well-being, just as eating a well balanced diet is for us. In order to understand how and what to feed cats, it is necessary to understand how the nutritional requirements of the cat have developed through the process of biological evolution.

  • The first inclination of some people when feeding a home-prepared diet to their pet is to simply feed the animal leftovers of what they are eating. It should be realized, however, that the nutritional needs of dogs, cats and humans differ.

  • As a modern society, we understand the importance of food quality in maintaining or improving our health. We know that we need to eat good quality food in the appropriate quantity and balance for optimal health.

  • As far back as 1953, veterinarians recognized the relationship between nutrition and the health of the skin and haircoat.

  • Hospitalization can have a profoundly negative impact on a cat’s nutritional status. Hospitalized cats are commonly malnourished due to decreased food intake which can lead to decreased immune system function, decreased ability of the body’s tissues to repair and restore themselves, and abnormal drug metabolism.

  • In North America, obesity is the most common preventable disease in cats. Approximately 25-35% of the general feline population is obese, with 40-45% of cats aged 5-11 years old weighing in higher than normal.