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Dogs + Diagnosis

  • Your dog has been scheduled for an endoscopic examination. The purpose of this procedure is to help your veterinarian make a diagnosis of the disease that has been causing your pet's clinical signs of vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss, abdominal pain or swelling or loss of appetite.

  • A fecal Baermann is a specialized test for detecting certain types of parasites or “worms.”

  • Fecal flotation is a routine veterinary test used to diagnose internal parasites or “worms”. The test detects the eggs of mature parasites that live inside the body and pass their eggs to the outside by shedding them in the host's stool.

  • “Fecal occult blood” refers to the presence of small quantities of blood in the stool that cannot be seen with the naked eye (“occult” means “concealed from view”). The blood can come from anywhere in the digestive tract, including the mouth, stomach, intestines or rectum.

  • Flow cytometry is a laboratory technique that can be used for counting, examining, and sorting cells. The technology to perform flow cytometry is often incorporated into automated laboratory equipment such as hematology analyzers.

  • A diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA) in your dog can feel devastating and even overwhelming. After all, we know that OA is a progressive, degenerative disease that will worsen over time. By most estimates, 20% of all dogs (regardless of age) are affected by OA, making it the most common chronic disease they face. Once a dog is diagnosed with OA, it is important to understand that our focus is management rather than cure. Success means maximizing your dog’s comfort and function while minimizing pain.

  • A Holter monitor (also called an ambulatory electrocardiography device) is named after its inventor, Dr. Norman J. Holter who was a prominent American biophysicist of the 1940's. A Holter monitor is a portable device used to continuously monitor the electrical activity of the heart.

  • Calcium is a mineral that is found in small quantities throughout the body. It is plays an important role in such varied and vital functions as muscle contraction, transmission of nerve impulses, blood clotting, and bone growth. Hypercalcemia is when the level of calcium in the blood is higher than normal.

  • Calcium is a mineral that is found in small quantities throughout the body. It plays an important role in such diverse and vital functions including muscle contraction, transmission of nerve impulses, blood clotting, and bone growth. Hypocalcemia means that the level of calcium in the blood is abnormally low.

  • Generally, the following screening tests are recommended: a complete blood count (CBC), a serum biochemical profile, and a urinalysis.